What we do:

  1. Conduct educational programs including interpretive tours, fieldtrips, summer day camps.
  2. Build and maintain the boardwalk system in the Delta Nature Reserve, the only accessible part of Burns Bog, so you can enjoy this ecological gem without damaging the sensitive vegetation. The boardwalks are stroller, wheelchair, and bike accessible.
  3. Network with leading scientists to give and distribute accurate and up-to-date information on peatlands. In 1995 Dr David Bellemy discovered that Burns Bog was regenerating after the peat harvesting. He told the Society that, “ you have proved by accident in Burns Bog the theory that the bog will regenerate within 40 years!”
  4. Publish peatland education material for all ages.
  5. Attend events related to peatland conservation. These include everything from the Peatland Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland to local city council meetings.
  6. Partner with other environmental organizations and academic institutions.
  7. Host awareness events such as International Bog Days, Jog for the Bog, Burns Bog Gala, and the Pilgrimage to Burns Bog.

 

  • Our Roots 

    burns bog happy

    In 1988, twenty concerned citizens founded the Burns Bog Conservation Society. They along with other members of the community had successfully stopped a major development that would have seen Burns Bog put under 20 feet of landfill and converted to commercial, residential, industrial and one square mile scooped out for a deep-sea port.

    The founders realized that they had won “the battle but not the war” to protect Burns Bog. In order to ensure long-term protection we continue to educate people about the ecological benefits of the Bog and raise awareness about the need to protect it for future generations.

    The Society is a registered society in British Columbia (S-24249) and a registered Canadian charity (BN 12916 6682 RR0001).

    Burns Bog Conservation Society Timeline

    1988

    1. The Burns Bog Conservation Society is founded

    1992

    1. The Burns Bog Conservation Society conducted its first field trip of the Delta Nature Reserve for a group of Surrey students

    1994

    1. The Burns Bog Conservation Society becomes a registered charity

    1995

    1. Funding was secured from the Shell Oil Company and the North Delta Lions to begin re-opening trails in the Delta Nature Reserve. Boardwalk Construction in the Delta Nature Reserve begins.
    2. A Quick Guide to Burns Bog” was published. This book launched the start of the Burns Bog Conservation Societies education program.
    3. The U.K. scientist Dr. David Bellamy invited to visit Burns Bog. Dr. David Bellamy had been to Burns Bog once before in the 1970’s to gather footage for a film, but decided Burns Bog was too damaged from Peat Moss harvesting to be included in the film. Upon his 1995 return, he was shocked to see that Burns Bog was regenerating from this harvesting, telling the Society “you have proved by accident in Burns Bog the theory that the bog will regenerate within 40 years!”
    4. That August, two Burns Bog Conservation Society directors go to the Peatland Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland. Dr. David Bellamy is a keynote speaker, and uses the last 30 minutes of his speech to speak about Burns Bog. His closing words here “Burns Bog must be saved”. He received a standing ovation
    5. Two resolutions were passed at the Peatland Conference. One was to have Burns Bog purchased or expropriated from the current owners, and the other was to have it declared a Ramsar site. A Ramsar site is an area of wetland as defined by water, marsh, fen or, in this case, peatland.

    1996

    1. In partnership with the UBC Alma Mater Society, Burns Bog Conservation Society holds the first “Peatlands for the People” conference. Dr. David Bellamy is the keynote speaker.
    2. The Society holds the first International Bog Day.

    1997

    1. Dr. David Bellamy accepts the Society’s invitation to be its Hon. Chair.
    2. First Jog for the Bog held on Earthday.
    3. The Society receives the Cultural Diversity award, with emphasis on the achievements of workplace inclusiveness and translation of “A Quick Guide to Burns Bog” into Punjabi and Mandarin.

    1999

    1. Burns Bog Conservation Society works with the community to successfully prevent two-thirds of Burns Bog being listed for development

    2002

    1. First Annual “Celebrating Women and the Spirit of the Cranes”. 6 women are recognized for their contributions to the community.
    2. The Burns Bog Conservation Foundation is established.

    2004

    1. 4 levels of government purchase and preserve 5621 (2275 ha) of Burns Bog.

    2012

    1. Through the work of the Burns Bog Conservation Society and the tireless effort of volunteers and supporters Burns Bog achieves RAMSAR designation.

    2013

    1. Burns Bog Conservation Society celebrates it’s 25th anniversary and launches the “Building for the Future” campaign to build a Burns Bog Nature Centre.
  • Recent Newsletters

    Fall 2013 Newsletter Cover

    spring 2013 Newsletter cover

    fall 2012 Newsletter


  • kt.tour 

    The Burns Bog Conservation Society’s Vision is to:

    1. To educate the public on the importance of Burns Bog and the world’s peatlands.
    2. To provide opportunities for people to interact with the Bog’s natural environment.
    3. To ensure sustainable, ecologically sound management and governance of Burns Bog and other peatlands.
    4. To contribute to the local community and enhance community health, through collective participation in the conservation of Burns Bog.
    5. To protect and sustain Burns Bog as a model for other peatlands.